This summer the Carnegie Hero Fund Commission will be celebrating the awarding of its 10,000th Carnegie Medal.

Although the details of the 10,000th Carnegie Medal recipient will surely be remarkable, this hero will also represent the 9,999 awards that have come before them.

These men and women — regardless of race, age, geography, or socioeconomic class ­— voluntarily entered dangerous circumstances, risking life and limb, to put their own lives on the line to rescue others.

Although we have Carnegie Heroes stretching from Alaska to Hawaii and from one ocean to the other in two countries, we hope to involve as many people as possible in the celebration.

One way to participate is to record a video for the Commission to use in a larger media project where the public can hear straight from the Carnegie Heroes themselves. The video will be made available online and also be shown at an event.

We are asking Carnegie Heroes or the families of posthumous awardees to answer five questions in a short video:

  • What does the Carnegie Medal mean to you?
  • How did your rescue act change you?
  • What does the word ‘hero’ mean to you?
  • What were you thinking at the time when you made the decision to enter danger?
  • Why is the Carnegie Hero designation important?

Those interested can have family or friends film them or simply self-record on their phone. Other options include scheduling a recorded video conference with Commission staff, or, for heroes near Pittsburgh, scheduling time to stop into the Commission office for a brief interview.

Videos should include the hero’s name and award year as an introduction. Although high quality footage is preferred, this solicitation is a rare case of quantity over quality, so whether a hero has his or her own YouTube channel or can barely find the record button, the Commission is interested in hearing from them.

To participate or to find out more information, contact Outreach Coordinator Jewels Phraner at (toll-free) 1-800-447-8900 or

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